CORDATA BLOG

Cancer and Depression: Managing a Common Comorbidity

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

September 19, 2017 at 1:59 PM

Depression is one of the most common comorbidities after a cancer diagnosis. That’s no wonder. The severity of the disease, the impact on family members, the difficulty of treatment regimens, uncertain outcomes, the financial strain and other factors can lead to depression or exacerbate existing depression. The depression is easy to overlook when other symptoms – such as sleep problems, weight loss or pain – are more severe.

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Topics: Cancer Management

Five Trends Affecting Cancer Care

Posted by Cordata Health

August 22, 2017 at 11:35 AM

The oncology treatment landscape is continuously shifting. Along with new discoveries and innovations consistently popping up, overarching trends in the health care industry are bound to affect the way we address cancer treatment.

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Topics: reimbursement, Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination, Patient Engagement, Value-Based Care

Pivotal Distress Screening Adherence is a Key Cost Container

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

August 3, 2017 at 10:15 AM

It’s easy to overlook important information when a patient is first diagnosed — many factors could easily lead to hospital readmission after initial treatment. And for cancer patients, there is an especially high risk for distress-related comorbidities. While chronic pain is a common problem for survivors, addressing psychological factors also plays a large role in recovery. In fact, a recent study in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network shows that in a two-month period following screening for distress, adherence to screening protocols led to fewer emergency department visits and hospitalizations.

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Topics: CoC, operational metrics, Cancer Management, Screening, Patient Outcomes

Patients Who Self-Report Symptoms Live Longer

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

June 20, 2017 at 10:27 AM

Physician: "How have you been feeling this week?"
Patient: "I was pretty sick – vomiting a lot. Not sure if it was one of the meds I am on or not."
Physician: “Why didn’t you call? We could have perhaps called in a prescription to help you or changed your meds.”
Patient: “Well, I didn’t want to bother you.”

This is a sample conversation like one that Dr. Ethan Basch, who is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology at UNC, alluded to in a recent podcast. Many physicians regularly face similar situations because patients feel uncomfortable self-reporting symptoms associated with diseases and treatment.

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Topics: patient satisfaction, oncology, Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination, Patient Engagement, Patient Outcomes

Survivorship Can Be Harder than Treatment -  Honoring Survivors Throughout Their Lives

Posted by Cordata Health

June 4, 2017 at 8:00 AM

June 4th was National Cancer Survivors Day and at Cordata we want to recognize all of the hard work that care coordinators, nurse navigators, care managers and providers do to help survivors figure out what to do "now" – at the end of active treatment. So many patients get so comfortable with their close relationships with their care team that they are unsure about life on their own as a survivor. It is both exciting and scary.

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Topics: Cancer Management

A Quick Overview of Value-Based Care and Payment Models in Cancer Care

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

May 9, 2017 at 3:24 PM

MACRA. MIPS. APMS. Value-based care. All of these topics can certainly be confusing. Still, CEOs and physicians face largely the same problem: balancing the requirements for so many different fee structures. Fee-for-service and alternative payment models (APMs) will exist simultaneously for quite some time under MACRA. And then there are the merit-based incentive payment systems (MIPS).

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Topics: Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination, Payment Models, Value-Based Care, MACRA

Still Thinking Oncology Care Coordination Is Too Expensive - Think Again

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

February 6, 2017 at 4:24 PM

From 2013 to 2015, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Health System hired non-licensed staff to help high-cost and high-risk cancer patients navigate the medical system and their treatments as part of their Patient Care Connect Program (PCCP). The patient navigators specifically linked patients with resources, improved care coordinated, anticipated their health needs, and encouraged patients to play a more active role in healthcare decision-making.

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Topics: ROI, Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination

Studies Link Cancer Patients' Survival Time to Insurance Status

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

September 26, 2016 at 10:03 AM

Insurance covers many aspects of medical care – from providing coordinated transportation for patients to procedures to medication – and the numbers show that these benefits have a profound impact on cancer survivorship. Two recent studies published in the August issue of Cancer have found that people with cancer who are privately insured have better chances of survival and less chance of the cancer metastasizing (spreading to other locations) than those who were either uninsured or covered by Medicaid. 

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Topics: survivorship, oncology, Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination, Health Insurance

The Cancer Experience Registry®: An Exciting New Resource for the Cancer Community

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

August 16, 2016 at 1:19 PM

The Cancer Experience Registry® is a community database that collects patient experiences posted by people with cancer and their loved ones. The Registry’s goal is to "create and foster a community of people impacted by cancer by collecting, analyzing and sharing knowledge and insights about the cancer experience.” Patients are encouraged to share information about their experience to benefit others with cancer and to offer a "voice" to the cancer patient community. 

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Topics: oncology, patient education, Cancer Management

The Silver Tsunami of Cancer Survivors

Posted by Cam McClellan Teems

August 8, 2016 at 12:43 PM

The “cancer tsunami” that will result from new diagnoses of baby boomers is accounted for on the strategic plans of many health systems. However, new reports about the pending "silver tsunami” of cancer survivors must also factor into plans.  In the July 1 edition of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers published a report that said those in cancer survivorship will grow exponentially, with the category of survivors aged 65 or older growing the most and representing nearly 75% of cancer survivors by 2040.

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Topics: survivorship, Cancer Management, Navigation & Care Coordination, Patient Engagement

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